A series, presented in partnership with getfit@MIT

By now, you’ve put hundreds of thousands of steps on those trusty shoes of yours. You’ve formed a bond with them. Each morning, they wait patiently by the door for you to step in and hit the pavement.

So what happens when they don’t feel as great as they used to?

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Sneakers are awesome but they don’t live forever. The materials that they’re made of eventually compress and break down, which means you need to replace them.

HOW DO I KNOW WHEN IT’S TIME TO REPLACE MY SHOES?

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Around the 6-8 month mark, think about coming back for a new shoe fitting.

Generally, running and walking shoes last about 300-500 miles. Newer cushioning technology is giving shoes more durability, so we’re leaning closer to that 500-mile threshold.

500 miles seems like an impossibly long distance – but it’s easier to get there than you think. This mileage total is not exclusive to your “exercise” walks and runs. Any mileage that you put on the shoe counts. So if you’re wearing them around all day everyday, shoes will wear down a lot more quickly than you think.

If you’re putting 10 miles per week on the shoes, they should be replaced every year (10 miles x 52 weeks = 520 miles). But you’re probably putting a lot more than 10 miles per week on them. 10,000 steps a day equals approximately 5 miles. And that’s just one day!

We generally recommend that around the six-month mark, start thinking about re-upping your shoes. And start paying a little more attention to your body. Do you feel achier than usual? Do your feet hurt after your walk or run? Those are classic signs that the shoe isn’t getting it done for you anymore.


RELATED CONTENT: [THE RIGHT FIT] [COMFORT IS KING] [INJURY GUIDE] [STRETCHING] [HYDRATION] [REST] [PLAN FOR THE WEATHER] [RUNNING & WALKING SAFETY] [(DON’T) LISTEN TO YOUR BODY]