Given the ridiculously warm weather the past two days, we're being given a rare February glimpse of Dan's calves; it's like the Groundhog not seeing his shadow for once.

In any case, today's shoe is the Saucony Hurricane 14. The 2012 version of the Hurricane is one of the first in the entire Saucony line to feature the 8mm heel-toe offset soon to grace the entire product line.

In terms of product design, the Hurricane is intended as a moderate stability, high-cushion, high-mileage trainer. Over the years, the Hurricane has gone from a bulky to svelte, and this most recent iteration is a prime example of the less-is-more mentality permeating the Saucony lineup: the Hurricane 14 weighs in at a very lean 11.2oz in the men's sample size.

How Saucony achieved that weight savings is the real game-changer, however. In a footwear industry rife with technologies purported to be the best thing since sliced bread AND the toaster, nearly all vendors have gotten caught up in what amounts to a Cold War of visible technology callouts: little plastic bubbles that show the fancy new cushioning system in an attempt to market from the wall; the more, the better.

Instead of following the pack, Saucony has decided to let the wearer decide if the new tech is worth the try-on, and has deleted those callout windows and other showy gadgetry for a substantial weight savings. Sure, the shoes may look more subdued than their counterparts, but you didn't buy your iPad because of its packaging, did you?